Throw Away Relationships

by Terry Wane Benton

We live in a world of throw away things. If we don't want something anymore, we simply throw it away or trade it off for something new and different. Man has thrown away his responsibility to God, and then throws away anyone else that tries to stand in his way. Children grow up seeing how mom and dad threw away the family and their own relationship because those relationships were built on throw-away principles and throw-away vows. They learn from what they see that people can be easily thrown away. This filters into other relationships so that they become superficial.

When the world of throw-away-relationships leavens the church, we find that we can throw away brethren over the slightest matters and think nothing of it. Not only will we not love with a depth of commitment to die for one another, which is what Jesus wants in us, but we may not value each other at all, and set ourselves up for no commitment at all to the people who should be highly esteemed as brothers and sisters in Christ.

Love should be the glue (Gorilla tough glue) that believes in the value of forming and keeping relationships, working through problems together because we believe in the worth of that relationship. The world of throw-away-relationships contaminates love so that it is no longer real love but something wimpy, unstable, and shallow. It has no strength, no glue to stick with people. It contaminates the will to value people enough to work with them through issues. Thus, it never learns true love and commitment. We become a people easily offended and ready and willing to throw away yet another person made in the image of God.

Since the two greatest commandments call us to love God and our neighbor (Matthew 22:37-40), we must ask ourselves constantly, "how deep and genuine is your love-principle?" Has it been cheapened and contaminated by the world of cheap, throw-away-relationships? Can we stand before God in the judgment without genuine love that we believed in and worked at mastering so that it masters us? Will God be pleased if all we hold in our hands are throw-away-relationships? Let us determine to reflect deeply on this matter. We need to learn to love God more, love His holy word, His principles more, and how to love in the home and in the church and in the world with true good-will or love. Eternity is in the balance.

"Love suffers long and is kind; love does not envy; love does not parade itself, is not puffed up; does not behave rudely, does not seek its own, is not provoked, thinks no evil; does not rejoice in iniquity, but rejoices in the truth; bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things. Love never fails" (I Corinthians 13:4-8).