Question:

You added things to your “quotes” from the Bible.So you rewrote it huh? A lot of people seem to be rewriting things these days.

I’m an ordained Unitarian minister of the Universal Life Church, I have a BS in Theology . I also have an MS in Psychology and Philosophy as well. I believe in all ways as the one true path.

My question is simple: Who decides what is a “wholesome word” and what is not? The bible clearly does not define this and we both know that to be true, the words have to be popular and or relevant for the time period. It does not say anywhere in any good book I’ve read from the Qur’an to the Talmud and Torah to the Buddhist scriptures (I am monotheistic in faith, and I do not care what name you give God as language changes with time, and the lord speaks through all). Nor does it say we should speak in any manner as English is not the original Aramaic and Sanskrit etc. that we extracted the notes for the good book from to begin with.


Answer:

All quotes are from the New King James Version or New American Standard Bible. A claim that there are rewritten quotes is a falsehood given just to cast doubt on the accuracy of the material presented. Since you did not prove your point with evidence, the conclusion is that you've found proof given that you refuse to accept and are desperately trying to find some excuse not to heed it.

The one who defines "wholesome words" is God, since it is His book. "If anyone teaches otherwise and does not consent to wholesome words, even the words of our Lord Jesus Christ, and to the doctrine which accords with godliness, he is proud, knowing nothing, but is obsessed with disputes and arguments over words, from which come envy, strife, reviling, evil suspicions, useless wranglings of men of corrupt minds and destitute of the truth, who suppose that godliness is a means of gain. From such withdraw yourself" (I Timothy 6:3-6). Wholesome words are the teachings of Jesus and the teaching of godliness in the Bible.

Attempting to claim that words are undefinable is a common tactic to avoid the truth. Politicians do it frequently and are rightly mocked for it.

You prove yourself to be in error by your own words. You claim to believe in one true path and then proceed to claim that a variety of religions with conflicting beliefs are all from a single God and are all true. "For God is not the author of confusion but of peace, as in all the churches of the saints" (I Corinthians 14:33).