Question:

Why would someone not like the ESV?

What is wrong with the ESV? I saw "Which Translation Should I Use?"concerningI Corinthians 7:15:

"The ESV is the clearest that it is talking about slavery"

I Corinthians 7:15 seems to be talking about marriage to me, not slavery.


Answer:

"But if the unbeliever departs, let him depart; a brother or a sister is not under bondage in such cases. But God has called us to peace" (I Corinthians 7:15 NKJV).

"But if the unbelieving partner separates, let it be so. In such cases the brother or sister is not enslaved. God has called you to peace" (I Corinthians 7:15 ESV).

You'll find people, wanting to justify divorce, will claim that "bondage" in I Corinthians 7:15 refers to the marriage covenant because God joins two people together (Matthew 19:6). The problem is that the Greek word douloo refers to slavery. Marriage has never been described as a form of slavery in the Bible, so "bondage" is not referring to the marriage bond.

What Paul is saying is that if an unbeliever refuses to live with a believer, the believer is not a slave who must go with his or her spouse because of the marriage covenant. If the unbeliever refuses to stay, then the believer is to let the unbeliever leave. This isn't a justification for remarriage. It would fall under the rule that Paul mentioned in I Corinthians 7:10-11. But a Christian doesn't give up his beliefs, even for the sake of his marriage.

That is why I said that the English Standard Version was clearer about what Paul said in the Greek in this verse.

Every translation has flaws, and the English Standard Version is no exception, but what you will find is that some people refuse to consider any translation that isn't the one they currently accept simply because the other translations are different. That isn't using good judgment. Overall the ESV is a pretty good translation. I think the New King James Version and the New American Standard Version Updated are slightly better translations, but I'm not against using the ESV.