Question:

  1. What happen to Mary after the death of Jesus?
  2. Why is it that there is no contribution of Mary's in the books of the Bible? She should be closer to God than all other disciples after the death of Jesus.
  3. Why do we have many versions of the Bible? When God does not change, His word should not change.
  4. Does Christianity believe in destiny?
  5. What is the fate of those who lived and die before the birth of Jesus?

Please reply with evidence from the Bible.


Answer:

The Bible does not record what happened to Mary. The events in her life, beyond her interactions with Jesus, were not the basis of Christianity. All we know is that John took care of her (John 19:26-27). There is no mention that Mary was a prophetess. It was God who chose who would write His book and no woman was among the ones selected. We do have one Mary's praise recorded in Luke 1:46-55, but that is basically it.

The assumption that Mary was closer to God than the other disciples is false. There is no biblical basis for such a statement. See The Glorification of Mary.

We have versions of the Bible to handle the many languages in the world. You make an assumption that the various versions of the Bible teach different doctrines. God's Word has not changed. "Beloved, while I was very diligent to write to you concerning our common salvation, I found it necessary to write to you exhorting you to contend earnestly for the faith which was once for all delivered to the saints" (Jude 3). I'll grant you that there are some bad versions, but we call them bad because they don't accurately render the teachings of the Bible. It is because the Bible is fixed that we can make judgment about the quality of various versions. See Which Translation Should I Use?

If by "destiny" you mean a predetermined destiny to be righteous or sinful, the Bible does not teach that. See Predetermined Destiny. If you mean that someone might be selected in advance to play certain roles in God's plans, that is true (Isaiah 44:26-28).

Jesus' death brought salvation to those who lived under prior covenant and were judged righteous. "And for this reason He is the Mediator of the new covenant, by means of death, for the redemption of the transgressions under the first covenant, that those who are called may receive the promise of the eternal inheritance" (Hebrews 9:15).