Is Sunday the only day of worship or can we worship God any day? I have read in the second chapter of the book of Acts, verse 46, that the Christians worshiped daily in the temple.


"So continuing daily with one accord in the temple, and breaking bread from house to house, they ate their food with gladness and simplicity of heart" (Acts 2:46).

This verse tells us that the early disciples gathered on a daily basis at the temple where they had fellowship with each other. It tells us that they visited each other in their respective homes where they shared meals and joy. But neither of these two things are worship. In fact, concerning the later, we know that eating common meals is not a part of a Christian's worship. Paul scolded the Corinthians in regards to this matter. "What! Do you not have houses to eat and drink in? Or do you despise the church of God and shame those who have nothing? What shall I say to you? Shall I praise you in this? I do not praise you" (I Corinthians 11:22). Later he also wrote, "But if anyone is hungry, let him eat at home, lest you come together for judgment" (I Corinthians 11:34).

If I mention supper, would it necessarily mean a meal at home? Much depends on the context. When we say "the Lord's Supper," then we know we are talking about the memorial meal that is a part of the Christian's worship. But a meal at home is not worship. The phrase "breaking of bread" is an idiom for having a meal. But without the context, we don't know if it was a common meal or the special memorial instituted by the Lord. Because Acts 2:46 states they were eating food in homes, we know that it is talking about common meals and not the Lord's Supper.

Since the daily gatherings are mentioned in the same context, we conclude that these were not gatherings for worship, but simple gatherings to be with each other.

In the same chapter there is another mention of gatherings were we do conclude that it was for worship:

"And they continued steadfastly in the apostles' doctrine and fellowship, in the breaking of bread, and in prayers" (Acts 2:42).

Here we find a regular, consistent effort on the early disciples in:

  • Learning the teachings of the apostles
  • Fellowship with each other
  • The breaking of bread, and
  • Prayer

Prayer is definitely an item of worship. Learning God's Word is also something that can take place in worship as well as fellowship. Thus we conclude that in this passage, because of the items listed around it, that this "breaking of bread" is referring to the Lord's Supper (I Corinthians 10:16-17). However, this passage doesn't mention the frequency in which they met only that it was consistently done.

"Now on the first day of the week, when the disciples came together to break bread, Paul, ready to depart the next day, spoke to them and continued his message until midnight" (Acts 20:7).

The qualifying phrase "when the disciples came together to break bread" tells us what was unique about the first day of the week. Unlike other days of the week, this was the day disciples came together to partake of the Lord's Supper. We know it is not referring to common meals because we don't eat once a week, and we already know the disciples often got together daily for common meals from Acts 2:46. By stating "first day of the week" we are told the frequency in which this happened. It wasn't the first Sunday of each month, or on the Passover. It was a weekly gathering that occurred on the first day of the week. This is confirmed because another aspect of worship, the collection, is also commanded for the first day of the week. "Now concerning the collection for the saints, as I have given orders to the churches of Galatia, so you must do also: On the first day of the week let each one of you lay something aside, storing up as he may prosper, that there be no collections when I come" (I Corinthians 16:1-2).

While an individual may offer personal worship to God in the form of prayers and learning on a daily basis (I Thessalonians 5:17; Acts 17:11), the worship of a church occurs once a week on the first day of the week.