Question:

I currently stand in the position that it is a matter of opinion concerning a kitchen or fellowship hall. Again, that is where I currently stand.

Here where I preach, we do not have a kitchen per se. A majority of the brethren here would like to have one so that it would accommodate the many things we are trying to do in our area and among our congregation. There are a handful of brethren who are against it. We do have a few microwaves, ice-maker, refrigerator, and a few coffee makers. We did serve coffee and probably cookies to the church and visitors that attended our lectureship; some stayed the entire twelve hours on a Saturday. We did provide a meal on the Sunday. Of course, in so doing it requires tripping over cords, and there is no place to clean up, etc.

So, at this point I believe that having a kitchen is a mere expediency in the overall goal of reaching people with the Gospel. It does amaze me how many times we see the brethren eating and dining with the Lord in the midst of their work. We also see this in the church following its establishment.


Answer:

Your point about eating and kitchens reminded me of another's question. See "Using a Kitchen in a Rented Hall."

The primary point that bothers me is that you stated: "I believe that having a kitchen is a mere expediency in the overall goal of reaching people with the Gospel" yet I cannot think of an example in the Scriptures where food was used to attract people to the Gospel. Instead, I recall that after our Lord feed 5,000 and they followed him, he rejected them saying: "Truly, truly, I say to you, you seek Me, not because you saw signs, but because you ate of the loaves and were filled" (John 6:26). The fact that people were feed was incidental. It was not the purpose of the gathering, nor was it the point of the miracle. When the people following Jesus later asked for more food, he turned them down.

For something to be an expediency, it must first be lawful. Only then can we talk about which method is the most efficient for accomplishing the task that needs to be done. If we are going to feed people when we gather, we must first determine the command, example, or necessary inference that leads to the obligation on the part of the church to feed people. There are some, such as the feeding of needy widows who have no other family to care for them, but upon what are you going to base a general obligation to feed people?